What's the best and worst career advice you've ever received?

  • 26 April 2022
  • 3 replies
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Userlevel 3
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Good advice can be simple, practical, inspiring, thought-provoking or even life-changing. Some of the best advice I ever received:

  • It’s never too late to completely change your career path. Our hobbies and interests change and so do our values and priorities. It’s okay to change your job to fit your current situation.
  • It’s okay to not know the answer to an interview question. Just be honest and communicate that you are eager to learn (this was particularly helpful in technical interviews).
  • Work should fit your life, not the other way round. If you have to change everything about your life to fit your work, it may not be for you.

The worst advice was to apply for every single position even remotely related to what I wanted to do to increase my chances of finding a job (even if it’s not a job I wanted). It’s too difficult to keep track of so many applications, it becomes too stressful and your work is too important to compromise for the first position you’re offered. I think it’s better to apply for fewer positions but ones that you are truly interested in and dedicate more time to a few high-quality applications. 

Please share what was the best and worst piece of career advice you’ve ever received. I’m particularly interested in what piece of advice helped you land a job in Data Science! 

 


3 replies

Userlevel 6
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The best advice I’ve ever gotten for career (and life) was from my mum and it was to go for things you’re interested in and let others decide whether or not you get it. Basically instead of counting yourself out and not applying for a job that “you’ll never get” apply for it and see what happens. Often you surprise yourself and will get things you never expected to and even if you don’t, you learn a lot along the way about where your gaps are and what you can do to improve. It’s not that you’ll never get upset for not getting something you’ve applied for but you do grow more resilient to rejection!

Userlevel 4
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:plus1: to applying for as many jobs that remotely relate to what I’m interested in. “Great examples” were shown of a spreadsheet application tracker with 100+ open applications 🤯 

 

Userlevel 4
Badge +2
  • It’s okay to not know the answer to an interview question. Just be honest and communicate that you are eager to learn (this was particularly helpful in technical interviews).

This is also some of the best advice I’ve received! Interviews are typically designed to push and you find your limit. If you don’t reach your limit in an interview have you really shown what you’re capable of, or is the role to junior for you?

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